February Marks Black History Month

In an effort to educate all people about the vast contributions made by African American men and women throughout history, Dr. Carter Godwin Woodson originated Negro History Week in 1926. He selected the second week of February as two prominent figures in African American history – Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln – were born in that month. In 1976, the event was extended to a full month and Black History Month was born.

Below is a sampling of Black History Month events in Oakland throughout February. An * after the event name indicates there is an admission fee. All area codes are (510) unless otherwise indicated.

Through February 26, various hours
All Power to the People: Black Panthers at 50*
Oakland Museum of California, 1000 Oak St.
The popular exhibit, coinciding with the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Black Panther Party, provides a contemporary view of the Black Panther Party and its aims to serve oppressed people and fight injustice. In the gallery, uncover the history of the Black Panther Party – a history that is often misunderstood. The exhibit delves into aspects of the Party that are not often told, such as its survival programs, the presence of women and rank-and-file members, and its use of media and art. Rare historical artifacts; never-before-seen photographs; first-person accounts from former Panthers, scholars and community members; and contemporary art show how the Party continues to influence culture and activism locally, nationally and internationally.
www.museumca.org or 318-8400

Through Tuesday, February 28, various hours
Revolutionary Grain: Celebrating the Spirit of the Black Panthers in Portraits and Stories
African American Museum & Library at Oakland, 659 14th St.
Recent portraits taken by documentary photographer Suzun Lucia Lamaina are the result of a five-year project in which she traveled throughout the United States chronicling the lives of former members of the Black Panther Party. Ms. Lamaina’s original prints are exhibited along with text relating first-hand accounts by the former
Panthers.
637-0800

Through Friday, March 31, various hours
Black Love Project
Eastmont Branch Library, 7200 Bancroft Ave., Ste. 211
Sonjhai Meggette’s photographs explore family, community and fashion in black and white. As Ms. Meggette puts it, “I am committed to raising public awareness of how authentically beautiful we are by reinforcing positive images with photography.”
http://bit.ly/2jkunyX or 615-5726

Thursday, February 2, 10:30 a.m.
African American Heritage - New Orleans Blues Style
Asian Branch Library, 388 9th St., Ste. 190
Join author Kathy Z. Price as she brings the characters of her award winning bluesy picture book, The Bourbon Street Musicians, to life. The wacky farm animals in the story dream of being famous jazz musicians. Fun and mayhem follow.
http://bit.ly/2kyWHm0 or 238-3400

Saturday, February 4, 1-4 p.m.
27th Annual Celebration of African American Poets and Their Poetry
West Oakland Branch Library, 1801 Adeline St.
Community members of all ages are invited to participate by reading poetry, performing, dancing and/or displaying works of art. This year's theme is “The Crisis in Black Education,” although all themes are welcome. If you are interested in being featured in this program, please call.
http://bit.ly/2jqQZRF or 238-7352

Saturday, February 4, 8-10 p.m.
Magic of Motown Review Show featuring The Best Intentions*
Malonga Center for the Arts, 1428 Alice St.
The Magic of Motown is a concert review show that will take you back in time to celebrate some of the most incredible music created by black artist in ‘50s, ‘60s and ‘70s. This show will leave you talking about it for years to come. All music will be played and performed by the Bay Area’s own Best Intentions.
http://bit.ly/2k7ICLl or 238-7526

Saturday, February 4 & Sunday, February 5, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Black History Weekend*
Children’s Fairyland, 699 Bellevue Ave.
The Marilynn O'Hare Arts & Crafts Center is open with activities geared toward children and their families. Storyteller Muriel Johnson shares her passion and warmth with audiences of all ages; her interactive style keeps everyone captivated.
www.fairyland.org or 452-2259

Sunday, February 5, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
First Sundays @ OMCA
Oakland Museum of California, 1000 Oak St.
Be sure to visit the major special exhibition All Power to the People: Black Panthers at 50, during First Sundays. See exhibit description at top. Suggested donation of $5 per person helps the museum provide access to other visitors in the community.
www.museumca.org or 318-8400

February 6-10, various hours
3rd Annual African-American Literature Read-In Week
80 schools across Oakland
During this citywide reading celebration, community members volunteer in classrooms across Oakland to read aloud books by and about African Americans. In addition, schools will host Family Literacy Nights and Cross-grade buddy reading. Please visit the website for more information and to sign up to volunteer. For questions, email lilly@oaklandedfund.org.
www.oaklandedfund.org/read

Wednesday, February 8, 6-7:30 p.m.
From Labor to Reward: A History of Black Churches in the Bay Area
Bradley C. Walters Community Room, Main Library, 125 14th St.
The Black Church in the Bay Area has been a supportive and motivational institution for more than 160 years. It has provided leadership in the struggle for Civil Rights, political representation, economic equality and social advancement. Join Dr. Martha C. Taylor as she discusses her new book, From Labor to Reward: Black Church Beginnings in San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley and Richmond, 1849-1972, which traces the growth of 65 churches, from the Gold Rush days to the Civil Rights Era. This book is the result of many years of in-depth study of local history, religion, liberation theology and social movements. The author will lead an insightful discussion.
www.oaklandlibrary.org or 238-3134

Wednesday, February 8, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Maya Angelou: Poetry, Film and Music
Grand Lake Theatre, 3200 Grand Ave.
Join KQED Arts for a celebration of Maya Angelou through spoken work, song and film. Enjoy performances by Young Gifted and Black Sheros, Youth Speaks and local poets, artists and authors as they channel the spirit and legacy of Angelou.
http://bit.ly/2k5cRmz

Thursday, February 9, 10:15 a.m.
African American Heritage - New Orleans Blues Style
Martin Luther King, Jr. Branch Library, 6833 International Blvd.
Join author Kathy Z. Price as she brings the characters of her award winning bluesy picture book, The Bourbon Street Musicians, to life. The wacky farm animals in the story dream of being famous jazz musicians. Fun and mayhem follow.
www.oaklandlibrary.org or 615-5728

Saturday, February 11, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Black History Month Walking Tour
Meet at AAMLO, 659 14th St.
Jointly sponsored by the Oakland Tours Program and Oakland Urban Paths, this walking tour in downtown will highlight African American leaders who have helped shape present-day Oakland.
www.oup.org or 238-3234

Saturday, February 11, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Black History Family Festival
Allen Temple Baptist Church, 8501 International Blvd.
People of all ages are invited to enjoy a day of celebration presented by the Allen Temple Children’s, Youth and Seniors Ministries. Enjoy delicious food, music, drama, dance, spoken word, storytelling and more.
www.allen-temple.org or 544-8910

Saturday, February 11, 11 a.m.
African American Heritage - New Orleans Blues Style
Lakeview Branch Library, 550 El Embarcadero
Join author Kathy Z. Price as she brings the characters of her award winning bluesy picture book, The Bourbon Street Musicians, to life. The wacky farm animals in the story dream of being famous jazz musicians. Fun and mayhem follow.
www.oaklandlibrary.org or 238-7344

Saturday, February 11, 2-4 p.m.
Barbers, Books, Bridges Community Event
African American Museum & Library at Oakland, 659 14th St.
AAMLO welcomes Barbers, Books and Bridges for a special community event toward providing multi-cultural literature for youth. The event will feature storytelling, a book giveaway and conversation on the value of promoting culturally relevant reading materials to raise awareness and urgency, so that every classroom speaks to its student body and represents a diversity of experiences. Barbers, Books and Bridges is an Oakland-based non-profit organization that works to strengthen community relationships and promote learning through culturally representative and empowering literature. Please join us for the special Black History Month program in honor of this year’s theme, “The Crisis in Black Education.”
http://bit.ly/2kuoZOC or 637-0200

Saturday, February 11, 2:30-5 p.m.
Black History Month Tour with Chris Hambrick
Peralta House Museum, 2465 34th Ave.
KALW Radio Journalist Chris Hambrick will return to share the memories and history of Oakland’s Black Community in the amazing first-person audio stories and art exhibit she helped create: “What I Hear, I Keep, Stories from Oakland's Griots.” The interviews tell about the pluses and minuses of segregation, rituals to commemorate the Black Holocaust, combating racism in major league baseball, the deFermery Recreation Center community, the heyday of KJAZ, the Black Native community, the Black Panthers and many other iconic Oakland events and figures. Malcolm Westbrooks, one of the featured griots, remembers what it was like to grow up here as a child born after World War II.
http://bit.ly/BlackHistoryMonthTOUR or 532-9142

Saturday, February 11, 3:00 p.m.
Celebration of the Black Panther Party
West Oakland Branch Street, 1801 Adeline St.
Last year marked the 50th anniversary of the Black Panther Party (BPP), which was celebrated with numerous events in Oakland, including an in-depth exhibit at the Oakland Museum of California. The celebration keeps going with a program to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the founding of the BPP newspaper and the birthday of Huey P. Newton. DVDs and photos from workshops held in October at the Oakland Museum of California will be shown, and speakers will discuss the legacy of the BPP newspaper.
http://bit.ly/2jSTwm6 or 238-7352

Saturday, February 11, 6-8 p.m.
Unfinished Business: The Lives of Gwen
Center for History & Community, 2488 Coolidge Ave.
Hosted by the Friends of the Peralta Hacienda, watch a film and join the discussion about a treasured Fruitvale community elder, Gwen Jackson, and her resilience after sexual abuse and repeated incarceration. Hear the story of how she was able to give back to the community. Gwen and filmmaker Jonathan Hoffman will lead the discussion about root causes of incarceration, the prison experience and conditions, and the process of recovery.
http://bit.ly/UnfinishedBusinessGwenJackson or 532-9142

Wednesday, February 15, 6 p.m.
Ben Tucker’s Good Run
Bradley C. Walters Community Room, Main Library, 125 14th St.
Ben Tucker’s new memoir, A Good Run, is a coming-of-age story that spans the post-World War II era to the days of the Civil Rights Movement. As a student at San Jose State in the early 1960s, he was a world-class middle distance runner. Mr. Tucker worked as an administrator for the University of California at Berkeley and the UC Office of the President for 25 years. He will read from his memoir. Copies of the book will be on sale at this event.
http://bit.ly/2jv2TtR or 238-3134

Saturday, February 18, 1 p.m.
The Mighty Ring Shout and Its Spirituals
West Oakland Branch Library, 1801 Adeline St.
The nearly forgotten ring shout is an exciting, high-energy ritual that draws on African traditions of call and response, dance, storytelling, spirituality, communicating in code, and honoring our ancestors. Angela Thomas, Education Co-chair and Song Leader from the Friends of Negro Spirituals, will give a demonstration, with participation by anyone who cares to join in. Ms. Thomas will share her knowledge with a talk about the origins and meanings of this remarkable tradition.
http://bit.ly/2k8ZzWo or 238-7352

Saturday, February 18, 3-6 p.m.
Mindful Drumming Workshop for “Mishe” Happiness, facilitated by Kokomon Clottey*   
Attitudinal Healing Connection, 3278 West Street
Mindful Drumming is an ancient indigenous technology that uses the twin realities of rhythm and sound grounded in West African Ghanaian traditions. Its focus is to bring about an alignment of body, mind and spirit. Mindful Drumming is a path to pure joy, wellness and happiness. This experience will open a connection to the ancestors and their timeless wisdom that is needed now more than ever. Join in to experience the twin concept of rhythm and sound and understand that sound vibration is meditation. Together, we will experience diverse healing rhythms through the drum. 
www.ahc-oakland.org or 652-5530

Tuesday, February 21, 10:30 a.m.
Local Heroes Presents: Robert Liu-Trujillo
Eastmont Branch Library, 7200 Bancroft Ave., Ste. 211
In celebration of Black History Month, our local hero Robert Liu-Trujillo, storyteller and artist, will be reading his latest book, Furqan’s First Flat Top. Children will have the opportunity to meet Rob and learn how they can become writers and artists, too. For more information about Mr. Trujillo and his work, please visit his website at www.work.robdontstop.com
http://bit.ly/2jWV6mS or 615-5726

Thursday, February 23, 10 a.m.
African American Heritage - New Orleans Blues Style
West Oakland Branch Library, 1801 Adeline St.
Join author Kathy Z. Price as she brings the characters of her award winning bluesy picture book, The Bourbon Street Musicians, to life. The wacky farm animals in the story dream of being famous jazz musicians. Fun and mayhem follow.
www.oaklandlibrary.org or 238-7352

Saturday, February 25, 10-11:30 a.m.
Black History Month Tour
Mountain View Cemetery, 5000 Piedmont Ave.
Historic Mountain View Cemetery is the last resting place of many important members of the Bay Area’s African American community. In celebration of Black History Month, there will be a special Docent-Led Tour of the cemetery highlighting the lives of such community leaders as Capt. William Shorey, Alonzo and Jennie Prentiss, Lydia Flood Jackson and many more. Due to the large area to be visited, this tour will be by car caravan.
www.mountainviewcemetery.org or 658-2588

Saturday, February 25, noon
The Crisis in Black Education: Then, Now, and Speculative Conclusions
African American Museum & Library at Oakland, 659 14th St.
In honor of Black History Month, AAMLO will host a discussion with civil rights leader and education activist Oscar Wright on the crisis in Black education. The event includes a noontime screening of Not For Sale: The Oscar C. Wright Story, a compilation of interviews conducted by the late great actor and playwright Michael Lange with Oscar Wright. The film screening is followed at 1:30 p.m. by a discussion on Black education with Oscar Wright and AAMLO’s chief curator and historian Rick Moss.
http://bit.ly/2kupvfw or 637-0200

Saturday, February 25, 1-4 p.m.
African American Quilt Guild of Oakland's Annual Demonstration
West Oakland Branch Library, 1801 Adeline St.
This is a hands-on workshop. Supplies will be provided so that you can make your own quilt, with guidance from some highly skilled practitioners of the art form. All skill levels and ages are welcome.
http://bit.ly/2kueirr or 238-7352

Saturday, February 25, 2-4 p.m.
Freedom Quilters: A Celebration of African American Heritage
Melrose Branch Library, 4805 Foothill Blvd.
Celebrate African American heroes, past and present, by decorating a quilt square to honor that person’s legacy. Please feel free to bring pictures of your own heroes. All squares will become part of a library display celebrating African Americans’ contributions to American society.
http://bit.ly/2j9LGau or 535-5623